Mandated Reporters

 
 
Day Crisis Phone:
507 328-6400
 
After Hours Crisis Phone:
507 281-6248
 

 

If you are a professional who works with children and families, you are in a key position to help protect children from harm. Minnesota law requires professionals and their delegates who work with children to make a child protection report if they know of or have reason to believe:

  • A child is being neglected or abused, or
  • A child has been neglected or abused within the preceding three years.  
 
Mandated reporters include professionals and their delegates in the following fields:  
Babysitters
Child care
Child care center staff
Clergy*
Dental professionals
Education
Foster parents
Group home staff
Guardians ad litem
Health Care
Home child care providers
Hospital administrators
Law enforcement 

Medical personnel and professionals
Mental health professionals
Probation and correctional services
Psychiatrists
Psychologists
School administrators
School support staff
Social services
Social workers 
Therapists
Teachers and assistants 
 

 

Minnesota laws provide mandated reporters with great personal responsibility: 

  • If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, you cannot shift the responsibility of reporting to a supervisor, or to someone else in the office, school, clinic or licensed facility.
  • You alone are required to make the report to the responsible agency.
  • Anyone who reports child abuse or neglect in good faith is immune from civil liability. The reporter's name is confidential. It is accessible only if the reporter consents, by court order, or by court procedure.
  • If you are required to report known or suspected abuse or neglect and fail to do so, you are guilty of a misdemeanor.
Reporting suspected abuse or neglect is a serious matter that must not be taken lightly. The child protection worker, law enforcement agent, or licensing agency worker to whom you report may ask you to provide as many facts as possible so they can assess the child's situation and determine the need for intervention. If the child protection report results in a court hearing, you may be asked to testify. Any inconvenience of reporting is offset by a simple fact: the action you take may very well save the life and spirit of a child and provide a family with needed support.

When to report suspected abuse or neglect

The law requires mandated reporters to make a report if they know of or have reason to believe a child is being neglected or abused, or has been neglected or abused within the preceding three years. Verbal reports must be made immediately (no longer than 24 hours.) Written reports must be submitted within 72 hours (weekends and holidays are excluded.)